Elegant Thailand Wedding

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When I first spoke with Stacy and Brad they communicated how important it was to them that we created a design that felt natural in its environment. My suggestion was to create a Thai garden style look in neutral colors that would blend seamless with the gorgeous backdrop of the Amanpuri. We chose the symbol of the lotus flower as the motif for the wedding. The meaning of the lotus is deep rooted in Chinese culture, and its symbolism spoke to Stacy and Brad. The neutral color palette of creme, taupe and green was accented by the textures of Thai silk, gold accents, teak wood and handmade paper.

The stationery suite was inspired by the elegant simplicity of Thailand. We chose handmade papers and a soft taupe ink color for the paper goods. The invitation was backed on a linen card and mimicked the save the date which was sent in a box filled with dried jasmine flower. Clean fonts juxtaposed with calligraphy call outs kept the look simple and elegant.

The ceremony was held on a grassy lawn on the Surin beach. I had custom chair covers made to offer a visual of softness against the sand and water. To emulate the beautiful Thai gardens, I suggested filling wooden vases with water, water lilies and lotus along the aisle. The effect was serene. For their ceremony alter, I had a custom arch built with a peaked top that mimicked the Thai temple architecture. We covered it in orchids and garlands of jasmine, a flower traditionally used in Thai weddings. Upon their arrival, guests were handed woven fans to keep themselves cool in the tropical heat.

After the ceremony, guests mingled on the beach.  The signature drink, the Siam Passion, was tray passed to guests exhibiting two of the four key elements of Thai cuisine; sweet and sour. Custom wooden drink stirrers with the lotus motif were served with each drink.

After the cocktail hour guests made their way across the beach to the Amanpuri, where the reception was held. To mimic the Thai architecture and create a beautiful entrance, we custom built a wooden arch under which guests entered the stairs leading to the reception. Guests table assignments were attached to a board backed in linen and sat at the base of the reception structure. 

The reception was held over the pool, which was covered to allow for space. To mimic the beautiful existing pool house structure, we custom built as open wood tent, covered with clear tenting in case of any tropical rains throughout the evening. We covered the structure with greenery so that it felt like it had been overgrown with tropical vines. At each entrance of the structure we hung garlands of jasmine flower and aPhuang malai, a traditional Thai garland thought to offer good luck.

To add to the intimacy of the evening, I custom made square lamps  to hang over each guests table. The square lamps were made of Thai silk and offered a warm glow throughout the night. Soft falling drapery hung between the lamps, softening the appearance of wooden structure.

Upon arrival at their seats, guests found their names written in gold calligraphy on mother of pearl place cards sat atop gold rimmed chargers. Tables were draped with Thai silk linens, and a medley of local flowers and imported flowers sat amongst creme pillar candles.

To see more, visit the feature on Martha Stewart Weddings.

Photo: Cathrine Mead | Design & Styling: Joy Proctor Design | Floral: Bows & Arrows | Paper Goods: Yonder Design | Lighting: Charlie Lighting | Ceremony Location: The Surin | Reception Location: Amanpuri | Planning: Jeanette Skelton